5 Million Brazillian Workers Underage – Deep Brazil

child labor and slavery in Brazil

One hundred and eleven years after Brazil abolished slavery, the number of workers deprived of their freedom is still huge. They raise cattle, produce charcoal, sugar cane or timber. Some of them, most undocumented Bolivians, work in basements of small apparel factories in São Paulo and other metropolis.

According to the latest official statistics, the country also counts at least 1.2 million young workers between the ages of 5 and 13 – even if Brazilian law forbids those under 14 to work. If you add teens up to 18 years-old, you will have more than 5 million underage Brazilians in the market place. A huge percentage of them receive no salary.

This number includes teens “adopted” informally to work as housekeepers and submitted to very long hours. It also includes many sexual workers. Brazil’s highway police recently identified more than 1,800 truck stops around the country where minors offer sexual services .

A report released in September by the US Department of Labor, aiming to shed lights on “exploitative working conditions in the production of goods” in 77 countries, concludes that there is fair evidence that several Brazilian industries are responsible for perpetrating these irregular labor practices.

Brazillian Government Is Taking Action.

But the report also acknowledges that the government “has taken an exemplary, multifaceted approach to the elimination of child and forced labor”. It has “improved its legislative framework, enforced these laws effectively, established targeted action plans to combat child labor, forced labor, and trafficking in persons”, among other initiatives.

Last October, Brazil and a few other countries signed an agreement to work together to eradicate child labor by 2020, with the support of the International Labor Organization.

The Brazilian government also created the so-called “Dirty List” (Lista Suja) of forced labor cases, including the names of companies and property owners who use workers under forced labor conditions. In my former job, as a Social and Environmental risk analyst for Banco Real, one of the main financial institutions in the country, we wouldn’t offer credit to companies included in the Dirty List without promoting extensive auditing of their labor conditions and verifying their compliance to a series of laws.

There are, in fact, evidences that all these federal initiatives are pretty effective.

Between 2003 and 2008, almost 27 thousand people submitted to forced labor were released. Child labor has been steadily declining (in the early nineties, there were around 8 million under age workers in the country). One of the reasons is that the Brazilian economy and middle class are growing. Many families that had to find their kids a job now afford to keep them in school.

It is still not good enough. Civil society and the government have to increase their engagement in this combat against labor practices that are both shameful and deeply rooted.

Republished with permission. Originally posted as 5 Million Workers Underage by  Deep Brazil.

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3 thoughts on “5 Million Brazillian Workers Underage – Deep Brazil

  1. abdullah al assir says:

    how dont you dare on not finding a crack down solution for this problem
    imagin yourself as one of those kids
    be straight forward
    solve it befor its too late

  2. You are very right, not enough is being done to prevent slavery. Everyday people can help raise awareness for this cause and not only do that, but sacrifice all the time, money and resources that they have an abundance of compared to these slaves.

    -Reece

  3. Graham Perry says:

    Please spare a thought for young innocent, vulnerable missing British Citizen Madeleine McCann, now just seven years old. Madeleine disappeared from Portugal in May 2007. With everyones help we can bring young Madeleine back to her loving family in the United Kingdom, thankyou. GOD PROTECT YOU AND GOD BLESS YOU MADELEINE.

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